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Neely

He had a great love for some material objects

He had a great love for some material objects,

especially those that were finely designed and

crafted, such as Porsche and Mercedes cars,

Henckels knives and Braun appliances, BMW

motorcycles and Ansel Adams prints,

 

B?sendorfer pianos and Bang & Olufsen audio

equipment. Yet the houses he lived in, no matter

how rich he became, tended not to be ostentatious

 

and were furnished so simply they would have put a

Shaker to shame. Neither then nor later would he

travel with an entourage, keep a personal staff,

 

or even have security protection. He bought a nice car,

but always drove himself. When Markkula asked Jobs

to join him in buying a Lear jet, he declined

 

(though he eventually would demand of Apple a Gulfstream to use).

Like his father, he could be flinty when bargaining with suppliers,

but he didn’t allow a craving for profits to take

precedence over his passion for building great products.

 

 

Morgan Stanley planned to price the offering at $18, even

though it was obvious the shares would quickly shoot up.

“Tell me what happens to this stock that we priced at eighteen?”

Jobs asked the bankers. “Don’t you sell it to your good customers?

 

If so, how can you charge me a 7% commission?” Hambrecht recognized

that there was a basic unfairness in the system, and he later went on to

formulate the idea of a reverse auction to price shares before an IPO.

 

Fernandez, Wigginton, and Espinosa. Everyone loved Wozniak,

all the more so after his generosity, but many also agreed with

Jobs that he was “awfully na?ve and childlike.” A few months later

a United Way poster showing a destitute man went up on a company

bulletin board. Someone scrawled on it “Woz in 1990.”

Wozniak, who was living in an apartment nearby and working at

HP, would come by after dinner to hang out and play the video games.

He had become addicted to Pong at a Sunnyvale bowling alley,

and he was able to build a version that he hooked up to his home TV set.

One day in the late summer of 1975, Nolan Bushnell, defying the

prevailing wisdom that paddle games were over, decided to develop

a single-player version of Pong; instead of competing against an

opponent, the player would volley the ball into a wall that lost a brick

whenever it was hit. He called Jobs into his office, sketched it out

on his little blackboard, and asked him to design it. There would be

a bonus, Bushnell told him, for every chip fewer than fifty that he used.

Bushnell knew that Jobs was not a great engineer, but he assumed, correctly,

that he would recruit Wozniak, who was always hanging around.

“I looked at it as a two-for-one thing,” Bushnell recalled. “Woz was a better engineer.”

Wozniak was thrilled when Jobs asked him to help and proposed splitting the fee.

“This was the most wonderful offer in my life, to actually design a game

that people would use,” he recalled. Jobs said it had to be done in four days

and with the fewest chips possible. What he hid from Wozniak was that the

deadline was one that Jobs had imposed, because he needed to get to the

All One Farm to help prepare for the apple harvest. He also didn’t

mention that there

was a bonus tied to

keeping down

the number of chips.

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